CSU Voices and Views

Posts tagged with Faculty

Translating Research into Textbooks

Honorable Paul Lo at CSU “Journey to Success,” hosted at Fresno State on May 2.

(L to R) CSUSB Provost/VP Academic Affairs Andrew Bodman, CSUSB Professor in Public Administration Montgomery (Monty) Van Wart, and CSUSB President Tomás D. Morales at the university’s 3rd Annual Student Research Symposium on May 27, 2014 where Dr. Monty Van Wart was awarded CSUSB’s inaugural Outstanding Scholar award for his extensive research in Public Administration. Photo courtesy of CSU San Bernardino

By Montgomery Van Wart, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Public Administration
CSU San Bernardino

Beyond my passion for teaching, scholarly research is a close second. A misconception about non-science faculty members is that our sole expertise lies in teaching. What people don’t realize is that we too conduct research and engage in scholarly activity.

Whether teaching public administration, history, communications or any other subject, professors all conduct research to help our respective universities become the best institutions possible. At CSU San Bernardino, we’ve created an environment where research endeavors thrive. I’m able to bring the research I conduct in the field into the classroom to help give students a well-rounded understanding of public administration topics. More …

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Incredible Dreamers

By Dr. Terry Jones
Professor Emeritus of Social Work
Cal State East Bay

Dr. Terry Jones in commencement regalia

Dr. Terry Jones in commencement regalia

I can count on one hand the commencements missed in my 40 years at Cal State East Bay. It isn’t difficult to imagine being on a walker in my 90s and still attending commencement in full academic regalia. Even semi-retired, it is hard to stop participating in something that is both a rite of passage and reaffirmation of society’s highest principles.

There is this overwhelming feeling of joy at commencement. Yes, some of that is the relief of graduates who finished final tests or papers to earn their degrees – but, what I see is the lights turn on for kids in the audience as they watch a mother, brother or cousin cheered across the stage. The university is no longer abstract or distant. It is a place explored by the familiar footsteps of today’s graduates. First-generation college students dream not just for themselves, but for the family and friends that will follow. More …

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A Little Otter than Before

Photos and captions by
Brad Polzin and Erik Fallis

Throughout the month of July, CSU Monterey Bay hosts hundreds of young and aspiring artists, university faculty and accomplished art professionals from throughout the state.  The campus becomes a setting for exploration of students’ talents, artistic risk-taking, sharing of experiences, peer collaboration and professional constructive criticism.  All of this excitement occurs under the banner of CSU Summer Arts, the university system’s intensive and immersive arts program.

CSU Summer Arts is truly a little otter than before.  The program fully embraces their new home campus and its rather adorable mascot.  Several otter appearances punctuate the summer, including a costume for Zac — the son of CSU Summer Arts Office Manager Kelley Lansing-Moreno.

CSU Summer Arts is truly a little otter than before. The program fully embraces their new home campus and its rather adorable mascot. Several otter appearances punctuate the summer, including a costume for Zac — the son of CSU Summer Arts Office Manager Kelley Lansing-Moreno.

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The Chemistry of Fun

By Danielle Solano
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
CSU Bakersfield

A poster from the Boys & Girls Club captures the excitement of Chemical Circus.

A poster from the Boys & Girls Club captures the excitement of Chemical Circus.

The Chemistry Department at CSU Bakersfield developed a series of engaging, entertaining, and educational chemistry activities, called the Chemical Circus, designed to promote interest in science amongst local youth.  Engaged Department Institute grant funds were used to incorporate Chemical Circus activities into four undergraduate chemistry courses.  Undergraduate students taking these courses traveled to local schools and afterschool programs to bring chemistry to hundreds of community children.

An outstanding fifth grade teacher taught me that learning about science can, and should, be fun.  So as a chemistry faculty member, I am passionate about discovering new ways to communicate my enthusiasm for science to my students and members of the local community through educational experiences.  More …

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A Community at Work

By Karen Jensen
Chair, Department of Nursing
CSU Channel Islands

Students practice critical thinking skills in real time simulations

Students practice critical thinking skills in real time simulations

Communities often have unmet needs, despite the abundance of those with the resources and talents to meet those needs.  Sometimes the right connections require the catalyst of a university.

Having started two nursing programs through CSU Channel Islands, I have seen the community unlock its own potential.  Students with the right stuff – a mix of compassion, intelligence and drive – are provided with advanced learning tools and opportunities through partnership with hospitals desperate for their talent. More …

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A Scientist’s Responsibility

Sepehr Eskandari, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair of Biological Sciences
Alumnus of Cal Poly Pomona

Sepher Eskandari in the lab at Cal Poly Pomona.

Sepher Eskandari in the lab at Cal Poly Pomona.

My most important responsibility as a scientist is to teach the next generation.  This is because science is not static – it is not the sum of all existing knowledge.  Rather, science is a dynamic process that builds one discovery on top of the other.  Today’s scientific community is asking questions that will not be answered in my lifetime, but in my students’ lifetimes – perhaps.

I derive great joy working with and teaching students in my lab at Cal Poly Pomona.  Together, we research the chemistry implicated in brain processes that may one day lead to treatment options for seizures and strokes.  The work itself is rewarding but the intellectual curiosity and maturation I see developing in students who spend upwards of four years (spanning both their undergraduate and graduate years) in my lab makes a greater personal impact. More …

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Honoring Their Names

By Kay Takeyama Dilena, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Management
Alumna of San Francisco State

Professor Emerita Kay Takeyama Dilena, Ph.D. has established a new center for the Study of Japan and Japanese Culture at San Francisco State University.

Professor Emerita Kay Takeyama Dilena, Ph.D. has established a new center for the Study of Japan and Japanese Culture at San Francisco State University.

When I taught at San Francisco State in the 1970s and 1980s, I came to understand that I was instructing a generation that had no memory of Japan and the U.S. at war.  Within these students’ lifetimes, the two countries had always been strategic allies and economic partners.  The American-Japanese relationship formed the foundation of a cross Pacific exchange of goods, ideas and cultures.  I was amazed and thrilled to see the friendship evolve between my native and adopted nations, but concerned that we might be losing an understanding of the history that brought us together.

This experience, in part, led me to join with my husband, brother and sister-in-law on a book that described our family’s experience through World War II and the time that immediately followed.  My brother and I at the time were in Japan – my husband and sister-in-law in the U.S.  More …

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Following in Her Footsteps

By Terea Giannetta
Nurse Practitioner
Faculty at Fresno State
Alumna of Sacramento State and Fresno State

My aunt was a traveling nurse when I was a child.  She often visited my parent’s home sharing stories about different places and opportunities.  She would talk about the various aspects of nursing and about caring for people.

I followed in my aunt’s footsteps with a desire to explore.  I wanted to learn the profession, but also seek out different places and perspectives.  In 1976, I received my bachelor’s degree in nursing from Sacramento State – a relatively urban environment with great hospitals.  I then completed my Master’s in Nursing as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner from Fresno State, among the first graduates from this new program.  Fresno offered an entirely different experience, with a county hospital that sent me into rural areas with often-limited resources and issues with access to care. More …

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The Dream of Being a Nurse

By Monica Tenhunen, DNP
Gerontology Nurse Practitioner
Full-time Lecturer at CSU Long Beach
Alumna of San Diego State

Monica Tenhunen visiting a church in Krakow, Poland, as she indulges her other passion – travel

Monica Tenhunen visiting a church in Krakow, Poland, as she indulges her other passion – travel

Children have many dream careers.  For me, the dream was always to be a nurse. There was something powerful in caring for people – a type of joy that comes from touching the lives of patients and their families in a time of need. 

Now well into a career as a nurse practitioner I understand the less appealing sides of the job: long-hours, the loss of patients, mental stress and physical strain.  Yet, the most challenging situations often bring the greatest reward.

I once cared for an older adult who was dying of cancer.  Her bravery approaching the end of her life was remarkable.  Her grown children, however, were struggling with the prospect of losing their mother.  They became absorbed in their own fears and emotional turmoil and were not able to provide their mother with the support she needed.  As a nurse practitioner, I was able to pull her children aside and work through the end of life issues with them.  With a little more information and support, the family was able to pull together during this terrible time and provide comfort to a dying woman. More …

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A Showcase of CSU Biotechnology Expertise

By CSU Public Affairs 

The celebration of student and faculty work at CSU campuses statewide took place under the theme of 'Innovating Educational Practices for the Biotechnology Industry.'

The celebration of student and faculty work at CSU campuses statewide took place under the theme of 'Innovating Educational Practices for the Biotechnology Industry.'

Focusing on a wide range of cultures — from the tribal and corporate to the academic and microbial — the 23rd Annual CSU Biotechnology Symposium earlier this month showcased applied research in the CSU as it set the stage for students’ future success in scientific and technological careers.

To a lively gathering of about 500 CSU students and faculty and nearly 100 industry professionals, community college representatives and elected officials, the symposium presented panels of experts with global perspectives and the discoveries of individual researchers.

With 236 research posters, students from 22 CSU campuses described and discussed their findings related to genes, proteins, cancers, crops, nerves, viruses, and more.  Students, faculty and industry leaders dialogued through career networking, educational sessions and roundtable discussions.

Organized by the CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology (CSUPERB), the symposium is the major statewide event fostering the development of emerging biotechnology researchers and professionals in California.

Several awards celebrated particularly strong work by students and faculty. More …

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